Lightyear


Management: Peter Tanico (973) 668-2068

I am Lightyear, and I have been involved in music for most of my life. I'm sure it is safe to say that musicians live, breathe, and devour music, and I am no exception. I love dance music like nothing else. Sure I enjoy other music, but dance music is something I will still be listening to when I’m 80. I will be the one geriatric guy with a huge sound system in my car with the latest EDM or whatever is popular at that time pulling up to the old folks home!

I used to spend a lot of time in clubs dancing the hours away to dance music where I learned the beats and syncopation. I learned about a club called, “The Monastery, “ while I was still in High school at 17 years of age, and it was the only club In Seattle that was underage. This place was incredible. The owner was a shady character from NYC, and he used to burn frankincense and Myrrh in the furnace, so, as he puts it, you would wake up from whatever drug you took, and remember where you had been the night before.

It worked, not that I did drugs, but my clothes wreaked of that smell mixed in with cigarettes. He called the place a church, so he wouldn’t have to pay taxes. To most of the street kids, it was home, and a warm place to stay. He had airplane seats downstairs and a full screen movie area that played cult hits.

The best part of that place was the sound system. It sported 4 Phase Linear amps that pumped out a combined total of 2000 watts of bass. The people who lived two blocks away would complain that the bass was in their homes. I could actually hear and feel it a block away. I knew I was almost home the moment I stepped foot inside the place.

This is where I first heard hard cutting Disco music that nobody heard on the radio at the time aside from songs like, Funky Town, and Heart of Glass, but back then we had indie label’s that put out music you could only buy at specialty shops that carried DJ records. This is where I learned about dance music, and how it was crafted. Mind you, you still have to create a melody, but I began to understand syncopation, hooks, and format.

I am still learning today, and will till the day I die. You can never know enough, because although the basic elements stay the same, the music keeps changing.
I never really expected to be involved in music the way I am today. I gave up on music altogether and decided to pursue a degree in computer networking, but I was bored.

I heard some club music that got me excited again, and I decided to get involved in a big way. I have been told I am up against a tidal wave of competition, but my response has always been, "So what!" At least I am doing what I love. You have to do what you love, or you will be miserable.

You also have to believe. There is a huge amount of power in Belief that cannot be understated. I come from the school of thought that if you believe, it will happen. I know this from personal experience. I don’t claim to have some divine connection to the machinery of the universe, but I do have a connection of some kind to something greater than myself.

When I was 16, I began to learn to craft my own songs. I studied how others crafted their songs. Later, in the 1980's I toured with a band on Capitol/EMI records. I even wrote two of the songs on the album. The band had minor success on the dance charts with two of the songs I wrote.

I struggled with believing that I was any good at writing music, and I discovered that I’m very good at this. I may not be the greatest singer on Earth, but I can write music. I learn new things about myself every time I write a new song, and I discover more things I can do with writing a song. Sometimes I write three songs and don’t care for any of them, but find that there are parts in each song that work to make one complete song. This happened on, “Break These Chains, and on, “You’re the Only One.”

One thing I think is very important is that you can’t be everything. You can’t wear every hat in this business. You have to have help and work well with others. This is why I swear by collaboration. If you haven’t tried collaborating with another musician, please do. You will find that they can help take your song to the next level. To places you never even imagined.

Choose carefully. While some people can take your song to the next level, others can destroy it, or even bring you down to the lowest level. But, do it. You have to take risks in this business. I have produced several people, and I have worked with a singer in the U.K., named Tina Fisher, who is very talented in her own right!.

Currently, I work with Peter Tanico of E39 NYC Productions. He is responsible for the incredible remixes you hear on this site. Namely, "Celebrate," and "Break These Chains." Peter Tanico is also my manager. He can be reached at (973) 668-2068
I truly hope you enjoy listening to my music, and drop me a message and say Hi! I would love to hear from you!

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Management: Peter Tanico (973) 668-2068

I am Lightyear, and I have been involved in music for most of my life. I'm sure it is safe to say that musicians live, breathe, and devour music, and I am no exception. I love dance music like nothing else. Sure I enjoy other music, but dance music is something I will still be listening to when I’m 80. I will be the one geriatric guy with a huge sound system in my car with the latest EDM or whatever is popular at that time pulling up to the old folks home!

I used to spend a lot of time in clubs dancing the hours away to dance music where I learned the beats and syncopation. I learned about a club called, “The Monastery, “ while I was still in High school at 17 years of age, and it was the only club In Seattle that was underage. This place was incredible. The owner was a shady character from NYC, and he used to burn frankincense and Myrrh in the furnace, so, as he puts it, you would wake up from whatever drug you took, and remember where you had been the night before.

It worked, not that I did drugs, but my clothes wreaked of that smell mixed in with cigarettes. He called the place a church, so he wouldn’t have to pay taxes. To most of the street kids, it was home, and a warm place to stay. He had airplane seats downstairs and a full screen movie area that played cult hits.

The best part of that place was the sound system. It sported 4 Phase Linear amps that pumped out a combined total of 2000 watts of bass. The people who lived two blocks away would complain that the bass was in their homes. I could actually hear and feel it a block away. I knew I was almost home the moment I stepped foot inside the place.

This is where I first heard hard cutting Disco music that nobody heard on the radio at the time aside from songs like, Funky Town, and Heart of Glass, but back then we had indie label’s that put out music you could only buy at specialty shops that carried DJ records. This is where I learned about dance music, and how it was crafted. Mind you, you still have to create a melody, but I began to understand syncopation, hooks, and format.

I am still learning today, and will till the day I die. You can never know enough, because although the basic elements stay the same, the music keeps changing.
I never really expected to be involved in music the way I am today. I gave up on music altogether and decided to pursue a degree in computer networking, but I was bored.

I heard some club music that got me excited again, and I decided to get involved in a big way. I have been told I am up against a tidal wave of competition, but my response has always been, "So what!" At least I am doing what I love. You have to do what you love, or you will be miserable.

You also have to believe. There is a huge amount of power in Belief that cannot be understated. I come from the school of thought that if you believe, it will happen. I know this from personal experience. I don’t claim to have some divine connection to the machinery of the universe, but I do have a connection of some kind to something greater than myself.

When I was 16, I began to learn to craft my own songs. I studied how others crafted their songs. Later, in the 1980's I toured with a band on Capitol/EMI records. I even wrote two of the songs on the album. The band had minor success on the dance charts with two of the songs I wrote.

I struggled with believing that I was any good at writing music, and I discovered that I’m very good at this. I may not be the greatest singer on Earth, but I can write music. I learn new things about myself every time I write a new song, and I discover more things I can do with writing a song. Sometimes I write three songs and don’t care for any of them, but find that there are parts in each song that work to make one complete song. This happened on, “Break These Chains, and on, “You’re the Only One.”

One thing I think is very important is that you can’t be everything. You can’t wear every hat in this business. You have to have help and work well with others. This is why I swear by collaboration. If you haven’t tried collaborating with another musician, please do. You will find that they can help take your song to the next level. To places you never even imagined.

Choose carefully. While some people can take your song to the next level, others can destroy it, or even bring you down to the lowest level. But, do it. You have to take risks in this business. I have produced several people, and I have worked with a singer in the U.K., named Tina Fisher, who is very talented in her own right!.

Currently, I work with Peter Tanico of E39 NYC Productions. He is responsible for the incredible remixes you hear on this site. Namely, "Celebrate," and "Break These Chains." Peter Tanico is also my manager. He can be reached at (973) 668-2068
I truly hope you enjoy listening to my music, and drop me a message and say Hi! I would love to hear from you!

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