Black Feather

by //mKnoise

Black Feather - a virtual journey to a initiation of a black shaman.

On the eve of the ceremony, the young men under the guidance of the shaman cut a sufficient number of strong and straight birches. The precipitation occurs in the forest where the inhabitants of the village are buried, and to reassure the forest spirit, they sacrifice mutton and tarsun meat. On the morning of the feast, the trees are set up one after the other. You start by setting up a strong birch in the yurt, and the roots are in the hearth, while the treetop protrudes to the top opening (the smoke hole). This birch is called udeshi burkhan, "the doorkeeper", because it opens the sky to the shaman. She always stays in the tent and serves as the hallmark of the shame apartment.
The other birches are set up outside the yurt where the initiation ceremony is to take place. They are planted in a certain order: 1. a birch under which tarasun and other offerings are laid down, and red and yellow ribbons are tied to other branches when it is a "black shaman," white and blue for a "white shaman." "And bands in all four colors, if the new shaman wants to serve all categories of spirits, good and evil; 2. a second birch, on which one hangs a bell and the skin of a sacrificed horse; 3. a third, quite strong and well set in the earth, on which the neophyte must climb. These three birches, which are generally torn with their roots, are called "pillars" (särgä). Next, nine birches, grouped into three and tied together with a rope of white horsehair, to which bands of different colors are fastened in a certain order: white, blue, red, yellow; on these birches the skins of the nine sacrificed animals and food shall be exhibited; 5 nine posts to bind the sacrificed animals; 6. thick birch trees, placed one after the other, on which later the bones of sacrificial animals wrapped in straw are hung. From the main birch inside the yurt to the other trees outside, two ribbons run, one red, the other blue; this is the symbol of the "rainbow," the path on which the shaman will reach the realm of spirits, the sky.
When these preparations are completed, the neophyte and the "sons of the shaman," all dressed in white, proceed to the consecration of the shamanic instruments; One sacrifices a year in honor of the Lord and the mistress of the hobby horse, and brings tarasun. Sometimes one smears the stick with the blood of the sacrificial animal, and immediately the "hobby horse" becomes animated and turns into a real horse.
After this consecration of the shamanic instruments, a long ceremony begins with the offering of tarasun to the guardian deities, to the ancestors of the "Shaman's Father," to the local spirits and patron saints of the new shaman, to famous dead shamans, to the burkhan and other lower deities. The "Shaman Father" again addresses a prayer to the various gods and spirits and the candidate repeats his words; according to certain traditions, the candidate holds a sword in his hand and climbs on top of the birch inside the yurt, reaches the treetop, comes out through the smoke hole and loudly calls the gods for help. Meanwhile, the people and items in the yurt are constantly being cleaned. Four "shaman sons" then carry the candidate on a felt rug from the yurt and sing along.
The whole group with the "shaman father" at the top, behind him the candidate, nine "sons", the relatives and spectators, goes in procession to the place where the birch row stands. At a certain point next to a birch, the procession stops; one sacrifices a goat and the candidate is anointed bare-chested in the head, eyes and ears with the blood, while the other shamans beat the tambourine. The nine "sons" dip their brooms in the water, beating them on the back of the candidate and shamanizing.
You still fire nine or more animals. While their meat is being prepared, the ritual ascension to heaven takes place. The "Shaman's Father" climbs a birch tree and makes nine cuts at its top. He descends again and takes a seat on a carpet that his "sons" have brought to the foot of the birch tree.
The candidate then climbs up, followed by the other shamans. They all fall into ecstasy. He makes nine cuts on the treetop. While he is up, he shamanizes; on the ground the "shaman father" shamanizes from one tree to another.
Meanwhile, the dishes are ready; you make offerings to the gods (by throwing pieces into the fire and into the air) and the binge begins. The shaman and his "sons" then retire to the yurt, but the invited ones indulge for a long time. The bones of the animals are wrapped in straw and hung on the nine birches.

M. Eliade

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Black Feather - a virtual journey to a initiation of a black shaman.

On the eve of the ceremony, the young men under the guidance of the shaman cut a sufficient number of strong and straight birches. The precipitation occurs in the forest where the inhabitants of the village are buried, and to reassure the forest spirit, they sacrifice mutton and tarsun meat. On the morning of the feast, the trees are set up one after the other. You start by setting up a strong birch in the yurt, and the roots are in the hearth, while the treetop protrudes to the top opening (the smoke hole). This birch is called udeshi burkhan, "the doorkeeper", because it opens the sky to the shaman. She always stays in the tent and serves as the hallmark of the shame apartment.
The other birches are set up outside the yurt where the initiation ceremony is to take place. They are planted in a certain order: 1. a birch under which tarasun and other offerings are laid down, and red and yellow ribbons are tied to other branches when it is a "black shaman," white and blue for a "white shaman." "And bands in all four colors, if the new shaman wants to serve all categories of spirits, good and evil; 2. a second birch, on which one hangs a bell and the skin of a sacrificed horse; 3. a third, quite strong and well set in the earth, on which the neophyte must climb. These three birches, which are generally torn with their roots, are called "pillars" (särgä). Next, nine birches, grouped into three and tied together with a rope of white horsehair, to which bands of different colors are fastened in a certain order: white, blue, red, yellow; on these birches the skins of the nine sacrificed animals and food shall be exhibited; 5 nine posts to bind the sacrificed animals; 6. thick birch trees, placed one after the other, on which later the bones of sacrificial animals wrapped in straw are hung. From the main birch inside the yurt to the other trees outside, two ribbons run, one red, the other blue; this is the symbol of the "rainbow," the path on which the shaman will reach the realm of spirits, the sky.
When these preparations are completed, the neophyte and the "sons of the shaman," all dressed in white, proceed to the consecration of the shamanic instruments; One sacrifices a year in honor of the Lord and the mistress of the hobby horse, and brings tarasun. Sometimes one smears the stick with the blood of the sacrificial animal, and immediately the "hobby horse" becomes animated and turns into a real horse.
After this consecration of the shamanic instruments, a long ceremony begins with the offering of tarasun to the guardian deities, to the ancestors of the "Shaman's Father," to the local spirits and patron saints of the new shaman, to famous dead shamans, to the burkhan and other lower deities. The "Shaman Father" again addresses a prayer to the various gods and spirits and the candidate repeats his words; according to certain traditions, the candidate holds a sword in his hand and climbs on top of the birch inside the yurt, reaches the treetop, comes out through the smoke hole and loudly calls the gods for help. Meanwhile, the people and items in the yurt are constantly being cleaned. Four "shaman sons" then carry the candidate on a felt rug from the yurt and sing along.
The whole group with the "shaman father" at the top, behind him the candidate, nine "sons", the relatives and spectators, goes in procession to the place where the birch row stands. At a certain point next to a birch, the procession stops; one sacrifices a goat and the candidate is anointed bare-chested in the head, eyes and ears with the blood, while the other shamans beat the tambourine. The nine "sons" dip their brooms in the water, beating them on the back of the candidate and shamanizing.
You still fire nine or more animals. While their meat is being prepared, the ritual ascension to heaven takes place. The "Shaman's Father" climbs a birch tree and makes nine cuts at its top. He descends again and takes a seat on a carpet that his "sons" have brought to the foot of the birch tree.
The candidate then climbs up, followed by the other shamans. They all fall into ecstasy. He makes nine cuts on the treetop. While he is up, he shamanizes; on the ground the "shaman father" shamanizes from one tree to another.
Meanwhile, the dishes are ready; you make offerings to the gods (by throwing pieces into the fire and into the air) and the binge begins. The shaman and his "sons" then retire to the yurt, but the invited ones indulge for a long time. The bones of the animals are wrapped in straw and hung on the nine birches.

M. Eliade