DJ RageFace

Curator 258/512 HP 21/52 MP Curaga + Fira

After surveying the futures of the other characters, the author settles again at the grave of Bazarov. His parents come to pray and weep for their son, who died too young and who believed that his death was in vain. Yet the author refuses to accept Bazarov's fatalism. His sympathy is with the parents who, by loving their son, keep his memory alive. In effect, the author refutes Bazarov to keep his legacy alive. Speaking of the parents, he says,

But are those prayers of theirs, those tears, all fruitless? Is their love, their hallowed selfless love, not omnipotent? Oh yes! However passionate, sinful and rebellious the heart hidden in the tomb, the flowers growing over it peep at us serenely with their innocent eyes; they speak to us not only of eternal peace, of the vast repose of 'indifferent' nature: they tell us, too, of everlasting reconciliation and of life which has no end. (28.12)

A novel that so carefully depicts the rise of nihilism refuses to end on a nihilistic note. Instead it ends with a line of affirmation, an affirmation of human values that will survive every ideological revolution, every revolt of sons against their fathers.

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After surveying the futures of the other characters, the author settles again at the grave of Bazarov. His parents come to pray and weep for their son, who died too young and who believed that his death was in vain. Yet the author refuses to accept Bazarov's fatalism. His sympathy is with the parents who, by loving their son, keep his memory alive. In effect, the author refutes Bazarov to keep his legacy alive. Speaking of the parents, he says,

But are those prayers of theirs, those tears, all fruitless? Is their love, their hallowed selfless love, not omnipotent? Oh yes! However passionate, sinful and rebellious the heart hidden in the tomb, the flowers growing over it peep at us serenely with their innocent eyes; they speak to us not only of eternal peace, of the vast repose of 'indifferent' nature: they tell us, too, of everlasting reconciliation and of life which has no end. (28.12)

A novel that so carefully depicts the rise of nihilism refuses to end on a nihilistic note. Instead it ends with a line of affirmation, an affirmation of human values that will survive every ideological revolution, every revolt of sons against their fathers.

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