Preludes & Fugues Opus 2 Episode 1

by chichichi

Preludes & Fugues Opus 2
Episode 1 : C/Cm/C♯/C♯m/D/Dm

From leaflet:

Admittedly, I originally began to compose Preludes & Fugues just to amuse myself. The idea seemed huge and exotic – to invent all 48 piano pieces in 24 pairs of preludes and fugues in all major and minor keys.

Johann Sebastian Bach did it first, not only once, but twice in his lifetime, one set in 1720 and another set in 1742. Dmitri Shostakovich wrote one in 1951. Pachelbel, Chopin, Rachmaninoff, among others, have also composed similar set pieces covering all keys in some form or another.

Each of 24 pairs starts with a prelude which is a short piece in free or any simple form. The intention of preludes is to set out the mood and tone of the pair, to acquaint listeners with general ideas and feelings in a comparatively lighter and freer way. Then the fugue comes after. Fugues are contrapuntal piece of several melodic voices. Each independent voice is designed to interweave with each other in various manners using a set of rule and procedure that is strict in one part, specifically in the beginning, and more flexible in subsequent parts. The intertwined voices create textures that are markedly complicated, that can be highly expressive. They can be elegant, joyful, thoughtful, melancholic, suspenseful, or spiritual.

The art of fugues has never been a mainstream form of classical music. Their complexities and abstract nature require listeners to focus and absorb the feelings, content, and meanings. In my point of view, the act of composing preludes and fugues and the act of listening to them are deeply inspirational and greatly rewarding. Many pianists would insist that fugues are meant to be played then one can reach to and arrive at the beauty in the nature that fugues represent. I believe that in whatever mode of artistic activities that one might be in, fine arts give one what ordinary experience cannot fully convey. Preludes and fugues, among other art forms, unfold and manifest the truth and the beauty outside and inside us as we are a member of the nature.

On the Four Episodes

Preludes & Fugues sets are traditionally presented in one continuous 48 pieces of 24 pairs. It would take two hours or more to listen to the entire set. I feel that in this modern time, the set should be portioned into smaller sets called episodes. There will be four episodes of approximately equal length. Each episode contains 12 pieces of 6 pairs of music, running approximately half an hour. This is the duration of time that one can practically spend to focus. It is the minimum time that listeners can start to feel and benefit from the continuity of the set and create a meaningful impression in their minds. As a composer, this episodic arrangement would also serve to break out the period where similar ideas can be group with each other and mark the beginning of a new set of ideas.

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Preludes & Fugues Opus 2
Episode 1 : C/Cm/C♯/C♯m/D/Dm

From leaflet:

Admittedly, I originally began to compose Preludes & Fugues just to amuse myself. The idea seemed huge and exotic – to invent all 48 piano pieces in 24 pairs of preludes and fugues in all major and minor keys.

Johann Sebastian Bach did it first, not only once, but twice in his lifetime, one set in 1720 and another set in 1742. Dmitri Shostakovich wrote one in 1951. Pachelbel, Chopin, Rachmaninoff, among others, have also composed similar set pieces covering all keys in some form or another.

Each of 24 pairs starts with a prelude which is a short piece in free or any simple form. The intention of preludes is to set out the mood and tone of the pair, to acquaint listeners with general ideas and feelings in a comparatively lighter and freer way. Then the fugue comes after. Fugues are contrapuntal piece of several melodic voices. Each independent voice is designed to interweave with each other in various manners using a set of rule and procedure that is strict in one part, specifically in the beginning, and more flexible in subsequent parts. The intertwined voices create textures that are markedly complicated, that can be highly expressive. They can be elegant, joyful, thoughtful, melancholic, suspenseful, or spiritual.

The art of fugues has never been a mainstream form of classical music. Their complexities and abstract nature require listeners to focus and absorb the feelings, content, and meanings. In my point of view, the act of composing preludes and fugues and the act of listening to them are deeply inspirational and greatly rewarding. Many pianists would insist that fugues are meant to be played then one can reach to and arrive at the beauty in the nature that fugues represent. I believe that in whatever mode of artistic activities that one might be in, fine arts give one what ordinary experience cannot fully convey. Preludes and fugues, among other art forms, unfold and manifest the truth and the beauty outside and inside us as we are a member of the nature.

On the Four Episodes

Preludes & Fugues sets are traditionally presented in one continuous 48 pieces of 24 pairs. It would take two hours or more to listen to the entire set. I feel that in this modern time, the set should be portioned into smaller sets called episodes. There will be four episodes of approximately equal length. Each episode contains 12 pieces of 6 pairs of music, running approximately half an hour. This is the duration of time that one can practically spend to focus. It is the minimum time that listeners can start to feel and benefit from the continuity of the set and create a meaningful impression in their minds. As a composer, this episodic arrangement would also serve to break out the period where similar ideas can be group with each other and mark the beginning of a new set of ideas.